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agile

Agile Methodology: A transparent, innovative approach to design and development

Ed Wisniowski
June 15th, 2020
5 MINUTE READ

man with post-it notes in a kanban method of agile methodology

This article is the first in a series covering all things Agile, from Codal’s Director of Delivery, Ed Wisniowski. 

In order to be successful in today’s climate, agility is imperative. Businesses need to swiftly respond to customer demands. They must move quickly to meet changes in supply chains, labor conditions, and regulatory concerns. And they need to work at the speed of the modern internet—which means being able to make adjustments in a matter of hours instead of months. Mastering your business is difficult enough. Making sure your entire technology stack is keeping your organization running smoothly, quickly, and effectively on top of that is downright daunting.

As a leading design and development agency, Codal helps make sure your organization’s tech stack is able to stay ahead of the game in our highly interconnected world, affording you more time to concentrate on your business. We’ve worked with organizations around the globe for the past 10 years by being creative, customer-focused, and agile. Embracing Agile methodologies helps Codal deliver immediate value to our clients. A relatively new concept, the Agile approach was born out of a necessity to better returns on investments for large-scale technology projects.

A change is badly needed

In 2000, the Standish Group published a document known as the “Chaos Report,” on the state of technology management. The results were not encouraging. The report showed that only 28 percent of information technology (IT) projects were running on time and on budget. Projects with either missed deadlines or budget overruns were sitting at 23 percent. Failed projects made up the remainder at a staggering 49 percent. The report found that if you spent a dollar for technology services or consulting, you would receive just $0.28 of value as a return.

agile manifesto two men in suits with large scroll of paper

The birth of Agile

In the winter of 2001, a group of leading experts in technology and project management got together in Utah for a ski trip and a chance to talk. The product of that trip and its many meetings is what is known today as the Agile Manifesto. It was a simple document that outlined four basic values of how business should be run. It emphasized working solutions over heavy planning, responding to changes, respecting individuals, and working with customers as partners rather than vendors. It was a radical idea and it would have serious repercussions in the business community. The 2019 Standish Report revealed that over 56 percent of projects are successful when they are using the approaches and mindset outlined in the Agile Manifesto.

A commitment to continuous innovation

Codal has fully embraced the Agile Reformation. Each of our project managers are certified as Scrum Masters or Product Owners by the Scrum Alliance. We have a full-time Agile coach who leads continuous improvement courses, and helps developers and designers deliver better value to our clients. We set up partnerships with our clients so they have visibility into the work throughout its development process, and monitor that everything is meeting expectations at every step of the journey. By embracing Agile, Codal makes sure every penny you invest in technology delivers value.

We understand the changes in technology today. We know how to move at the speed of the modern internet. Our global staff can create multilingual and multinational digital solutions to meet your needs. This is all possible because we’ve positioned ourselves as an Agile business and we want to help you be the same.

Ed Wisniowski
AUTHOR

Ed Wisniowski

Ed Wisniowski is an experienced software development veteran and director of development at Codal. He has spent the last twenty years as a full-time employee and consultant. Ed has come through the ranks as a junior developer to architect; he has seen the good, bad, and ugly of how software projects are managed. In 2009, he discovered agile and scrum techniques and has acted as an evangelist for the approach since. He is currently a Certified Scrum Professional – Scrum Master and Certified Scrum Professional – Product Owner. He completed his Master’s Degree in 2010 with his dissertation comparing traditional project management techniques with agile methods.

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